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Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries (REDD): A Guide for Indigenous Peoples
REDD Guide for Indigenous Peoples
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Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries (REDD): A Guide for Indigenous Peoples

Download the guide [pdf]: English/ Spanish/ French

By Ingrid Barnsley.

In the context of the increasing global focus on climate change, attention is being paid to the role of the forestry sector in contributing to and fighting climate change. In particular, this includes a recent focus on opportunities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries - known as "REDD". Such activities can present both risks to and opportunities for the interests and rights of Indigenous peoples. For this reason, it is vital that Indigenous communities have accurate information to help them make, and participate in, REDD-related decisions that may affect them.

This is a short guide for Indigenous communities to climate change and to the current international debate surrounding REDD.

  • Section 1 introduces the location and features of the world's forests, and explains deforestation and forest degradation, and their causes and effects.
  • Section 2 explains climate change, notes the impacts of climate change on Indigenous peoples, outlines the role of the forestry sector in both contributing to and fighting climate change, and introduces the concept of REDD.
  • Section 3 explains the international regime set up to address climate change, namely the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and its Kyoto Protocol. It also explains how this climate regime addresses Indigenous peoples and how it deals with the forestry sector.
  • Sections 4 outlines international activity on REDD, both under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and in other conventions and institutions.
  • Finally, Section 5 canvasses some potential opportunities and risks for Indigenous groups to think about, and some tools and fora to consider, in advocating a position on REDD.
First published November 2008; Reissued March 2009
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